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Job Photographs

  • A man is sitting at a mixing desk, in a recording studio.  He is looking at various paper documents.

    Checking through the script before beginning a recording.

  • A man is sitting at a mixing desk, in a recording studio.  He is speaking to someone in an adjoining studio.

    Communicating with the actors, who are in the next-door studio.

  • A man and a woman are sitting at a desk, in a recording studio.  They are looking at sheets of paper and talking.

    Speaking with the programme's director about a possible change in the script.

  • A man is sitting at a mixing desk, in a recording studio. He is moving some switches on the control panel.

    Changing settings while recording is in progress.

  • A man is sitting at a mixing desk, in a recording studio.

    This studio manager is working on a radio drama series.

  • A man is sitting at a mixing desk, in a recording studio.  He is pressing some buttons.

    Making a further adjustment.

  • A man is sitting at a mixing desk, in a recording studio.  He is moving some switches.

    Adding background noise, such as birdsong, to the recording.

  • Two men are sitting at a mixing desk, in a recording studio.  They are talking.

    Discussing a particular sequence with a colleague, while editing the programme.

  • Studio/Floor Manager

Studio/Floor Manager

Introduction

Studio managers work in radio and floor managers work in television. They help make sure that programmes run as smoothly as possible.

Also known as

  • Floor/Studio Manager

Video: - Arvind: Studio Manager

Work Activities

Studio Managers work in radio and Floor Managers work in television.

Studio Managers

As a Studio Manager, you will work with Radio Producers (and other members of a production team) to make sure that studios and technical equipment are set up correctly for radio shows. Typical activities include:

  • checking sound balance and quality
  • controlling the mixing desk
  • recording and editing material to be broadcast

You might sometimes work in an outside broadcast unit. After gaining experience, you will probably choose to specialise in a particular area of broadcasting, such as sports, drama or music.

Floor Managers

As a Floor Manager, you will act as a link between the Filming Director and the studio floor. In effect, you will act on behalf of the Director, by taking responsibility for everything that happens on the studio floor.

You'll organise and co-ordinate everything from the Performers to the technical equipment. You will often have Floor Assistants to help you. You may also work on outside broadcasts for both television and film.

Travel and time away from home may be required, especially for location work and outside broadcasts.

Being able to read, write and speak Welsh may be an advantage when you’re looking for work in Wales.

Personal Qualities and Skills

To become a Studio/Floor Manager, you will need:

  • excellent communication skills
  • self-confidence and the ability to generate enthusiasm in others
  • patience and tact
  • plenty of stamina and good organisational skills
  • technical ability - especially in radio work
  • good hearing - a lot of information is passed to Studio and Floor Managers via headphones

Pay and Opportunities

Pay

The pay rates given below are approximate.

  • Starting: £25,500 - £28,500
  • With experience: £32,000 - £40,000
  • Senior Studio/Floor Managers earn £43,000

Freelance Studio/Floor Managers on short-term contracts earn between £150 - £400 a day.

Where could I work?

Opportunities for Studio Managers occur regionally in towns and cities throughout the UK. Most opportunities for Floor Managers are in major broadcasting production centres such as London, Birmingham, Manchester/Salford and Leeds.

Studio/Floor Managers work for the BBC, independent television and film companies, commercial radio stations, and satellite and cable television firms, often on short-term contracts.

Self-employment

You may work as a self-employed, freelance Studio/Floor Manager.

Where are vacancies advertised?

Vacancies are advertised:

Vacancies are also advertised in local/national newspapers, and on Find a Job(www.gov.uk/jobsearch).

Social media websites, such as LinkedIn, Twitter or Facebook, are a great way to network, find vacancies and get in contact with possible employers. Make sure that your profile presents you in a professional manner that will appeal to potential employers.

Take a look at our General Information Article 'Finding Work Online'.

Entry Routes and Training

Entry routes

The majority of Studio and Floor Managers are recruited from other broadcasting production posts. Experience in technical posts is particularly useful.

New entrants are often graduates or those with higher national awards. A variety of broadcasting courses are available.

You could make a start by getting some work experience in hospital radio, student radio/TV or stage management.

A great way to get into this career is through an internship. Take a look at our information article 'Internships', for more details.

Training

The BBC occasionally advertises trainee positions. Independent companies also run their own schemes that usually combine practical experience with off-the-job training at a suitable college.

Futureworks also offer a course. This is a diploma in TV and film production. It is designed to help you understand the production and post production processes used in TV and film. The units you could be studying include:

  • camera, lights and sound fundamentals
  • storyboarding
  • filming in a studio
  • outdoor filming and location shoots
  • directing
  • 3D composing
  • production workflow
  • colour grading
  • critical evaluation of audio content
  • software skills: Final Cut Pro, After Effects and Photoshop

Check the website for dates and availability.

Other courses could be available in your area.

Work Experience

A background working as a Floor Assistant or Studio Technician is helpful.

Having a track record of managing productions at an amateur or student level can also be useful. Voluntary work in local radio or theatre companies is often seen as relevant.

Progression

With experience, it is possible to specialise in a particular area of broadcasting or move into producing or directing.

Qualifications

New entrants are often graduates or those with higher national awards.

Maths and physics GCSEs may be preferred for radio posts.

Adult Opportunities

Age limits

It is illegal for any organisation to set age limits for entry to employment, education or training, unless they can show there is a real need to have these limits.

Experience

A background working as a floor assistant or studio technician is helpful.

Having a track record of managing productions at an amateur or student level can also be useful. Voluntary work in local radio or theatre companies is often seen as relevant.

Further Information

British Film Institute (BFI)

Website: www.bfi.org.uk

National Film and Television School (NFTS)

Tel: 01494 671234

Email: info@nfts.co.uk

Website: www.nftsfilm-tv.ac.uk

ScreenSkills

Skills for the creative industries

Email: info@creativeskillset.org

Website: www.creativeskillset.org

BBC Careers

Website: www.bbc.co.uk/careers/home

Wireless Group

Irish enquiries

Email: info@u.tv

Website: www.utvmedia.com

ITV Jobs

Website: www.itvjobs.com

Northern Ireland Screen

Northern Ireland Enquiries

Email: info@northernirelandscreen.co.uk

Website: www.northernirelandscreen.co.uk

StartinTV

Website: www.startintv.com

Edinburgh International Television Festival (MGEITF)

Tel: 0207 278 9515

Email: Info@thetvfestival.com

Website: www.geitf.co.uk/thenetwork

Careers Wales - Welsh Apprenticeships

Tel: 0800 028 4844

Website: ams.careerswales.com/

Wales Screen

Website: www.screenwales.com

S4C (Welsh Enquiries)

Address: Parc Ty Glas, Llanishen, Cardiff, UK, CF14 5DU

Tel: 029 2046 5533

Website: www.s4c.co.uk

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